Accentism in the Media

Accentism in the media

Below are some links to various stories in the media that relate to accentism and linguistic discrimination. Some are stories highlighting examples of discrimination, some are discriminatory themselves, and others are commentaries challenging such discrimination.

Leave off, will you? Britain should celebrate ‘regional’ accents

Slang shouldn’t be banned … it should be celebrated, innit

Teachers with Northern accents are being told to ‘posh up’, here’s why

BBC Radio 4 Four Thought: Language is Power

Ghetto grammar robs the young of a proper voice

‘And the time is now free firty’: Viewers slam BBC voiceover man for saying ‘f’ instead of ‘th’ in his continuity announcements

Those who ridiculed my accent highlighted their ignorance – not mine

Why people are still trying to ‘lose’ their accents [Podcast]

Accents speak louder than words (Listen to Britain 2017)

Young women, give up the vocal fry and reclaim your strong female voice

A response to Naomi Wolf

G’day mate: ‘Lazy’ Australian accent caused by ‘alcoholic slur’ of heavy-drinking early settlers

On a one-word reaction to reports about drunken Aussie accents

National Grammar Day: What language pedants and fashion victims have in common

The politics of accents

Accent prejudice in the mainstream

There’s nowt wrong with children’s dialects

There’s nowt wrong with dialects, nothing broke ass about slang

I’m sorry but you’re a racist

El test de Bérber

Hablismo: El prejuicio que estaba por nombrar

No, los andaluces o los latinoamericanos no hablan un mal castellano

Unlearning linguistic trauma: Identifying broken perceptions in the composition classroom

Love Island: Audience reaction shows deep snobbery about accents

We stigmatize accents but language belongs to everyone

BBC Radio 4 Archive on 4: Could the PM have a Brummie accent?

Everyone has an accent

Floury language: This Morning fans baffled by Nadine Coyle’s accent as she’s asked to say ‘flour’ again

Could a prime minister ever have a Brummie accent?

The sound of inclusion: Why teachers’ words matter